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A Closer Look At Jacqueline Nicholls’s Drawings

On 06, May 2015 | In Behind the Scenes | By

It began with a reunion of old friends. Happy to see each other and eager to share thoughts and stories. The text twisted and changed. Riddles, fear, esoteric expositions about the nature of souls. But all within the shared conversation between friends. Themes and patterns emerged. Eyes that see and cry. Clothing that conceals and protects, but also hints to what lies beneath. And fear that what is being revealed is not going to be heard.

The mystical journey is one of coming closer, unveiling, following subtle hints and yearning for connection. And the threat of being lost and alone, abandoned before reaching the safety of the other. This is a journey of the individual soul, who craves knowledge and intimacy. Each soul has its own way of seeing, but knowledge (and Torah) is revealed in relationship, and the individual longing to be understood by an other.

I followed the textʼs basic narrative. The friends meet, engage with the old manʼs riddles, that reveal deeper truths about the nature of different types of soul and the relationship with Torah and God. In the drawings, the eyeball is the depiction of the soul, becoming jewellery that adorns the maiden, the female embodiment of Torah. And ascending and descending towards and away from God. The drawings end with a fleeting image of the two friends in closeness. But it is only fleeting.

These drawings (below) are glimpsed at through fabric, echoing the multi-layered nature of Torah and the dance in the text between revealing and concealing. I chose simple rendering, just black pen and ink with wash. The water and fabrics give texture that hint to the textʼs darkness. The images evolved from sketches made during our shared learning and private reflection. Some drawings were too subtle and some were too overt. Itʼs a delicate balance of the erotic. How much to reveal and what to pull back. Trusting the other to understand what cannot be said.

And some things are difficult to talk about. Learning this text was disturbing and I struggled with much of the process. The Torah is characterised as a maiden in a tower, sending hints out and waiting for her lover to follow the trail, find her and seduce her. The text makes special mention that she has no eyes. She does not see, but she is seen. She does not search but seems passive. Rebbe Nachman of Bratslav turns this on its head. The maiden has no eyes because she does not see in a normal way of seeing. She sees beyond this world and reality.

Itʼs a sweet solution. Rebbe Nachman apparently taught the story of Saba Mishpatim when his daughter had an eye infection. The girl with no eyes prompted a retelling of the old manʼs riddles. For all the textʼs difficulties, I kept coming back to the compelling conversations and intriguing riddles. What does this all really mean…? And so I picked up my pen and tried to look beyond my usual way of seeing.

01 Process Image by Jacqueline Nicholls - for Kabbalah Film, The Wise Have Eyes

01 Process Image -the storyboard working out the sequence of the text and suggestions of images

02 Process Image by Jacqueline Nicholls - for Kabbalah Film, The Wise Have Eyes

02 Process Image Storyboarding – the maiden hidden in the tower.

03 Process Image – The maiden hidden in the tower

03 Process Image – The maiden hidden in the tower

04 Process Image by Jacqueline Nicholls - for Kabbalah Film, The Wise Have Eyes

04 Process Image

05 Process Image by Jacqueline Nicholls - for Kabbalah Film, The Wise Have Eyes

eye/no eye
05 Process Image – this was one of the first images. Drawing an eye and then erasing/obscuring it with water and ink

06 Process Image by Jacqueline Nicholls for the Kabbalah Art piece, The Wise Have Eyes

06 Process Image

07 Process Image by Jacqueline Nicholls - for Kabbalah Film, The Wise Have Eyes

07 Process Image – whilst we loved this image, it was not quite right for this project.
but we all want an eyeball necklace.

08 Process Image by Jacqueline Nicholls - for Kabbalah Film, The Wise Have Eyes

08 Process Image – These images were so problematic. Too dark/erotic or too obscure. Ended up using the kabbalistic diagram of the tree of life mapped onto a female face

09 Process Image by Jacqueline Nicholls - for Kabbalah Film, The Wise Have Eyes

09 Process Image

10 Process Image by Jacqueline Nicholls - for Kabbalah Film, The Wise Have Eyes

010 Process Image – these drawings are from another project about the Talmud. With a recurring image of the chavrutah. A learning pair who challenge each other to refine their thinking and go deeper into Torah study.

11 Process Image by Jacqueline Nicholls - for Kabbalah Film, The Wise Have Eyes

011 Process Image – Some of the images were drawn onto transparent silk organza. to use as a layer over the drawings on paper

12 Process Image by Jacqueline Nicholls - for Kabbalah Film, The Wise Have Eyes

012 Process Image

13 Process Image by Jacqueline Nicholls - for Kabbalah Film, The Wise Have Eyes

013 Process Image

Take a look at the film that these images inspired The Wise Have Eyes.

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